"Fall of Man" Free digital download

_MG_2176+S.jpg
_MG_2176+S.jpg

"Fall of Man" Free digital download

0.00
Add To Cart

"Fall of Man" (words and music by Eric Lee)

Lyrics:

As the Sun does set, I can hear the roll of thunder

The sound of no songbirds singing to the mournful skies

How many lives in this world have been squandered

Soon will come the day when that Sun refuse to rise

 

You who have ears, yet never have listened

You who have eyes, yet choose to not see

All of the damage you've caused the great mother

Blackened her skies and poisoned her seas

 

And all by your own hand

Woe to the Fall of Man

 

Hate and destruction are the seeds you have planted

Death be your harvest, you children of Cain

Damned, you will never return to the Garden

For blood's on the altar from the brother you've slain

 

And all by your own hand

Woe to the Fall of Man

 

As the Sun does set, I can hear the roll of thunder

The sound of no songbirds singing to the mournful skies

How many lives in this world have been squandered

Soon will come the day when that Sun refuse to rise

Reviews

“Miles above the Ground” opens this six song set of originals from Western Massachusetts phenom Eric Lee who brings his smooth, compelling voice and introspection to this strong four and a half minute composition.  Lee has more than a grasp of the vibrations he sends forth, playing violins, mandolin, electric violin and guitar with the music here focused, entertaining and highly commercial.  “The Raven” shuffles along under J.J. O’Connell’s drums and the bass of Rhees Williams while “Rose and Storm” adds a balance.  Critics can compare the storytelling of a Gordon Lightfoot to the dramas offered by Jim Croce, but to say that Eric Lee paints with his own style and magic is to understate what this artist has crafted.  And take caution – there are many, many singer/songwriters out there named Eric Lee, so one has to seek out the music that I’m writing about here. Lee has performed on the road with the great Eric Andersen, Peter Rowan of The Rowan Brothers and Seatrain, John Gorka, Vance Gilbert, the Grand Slambovians and so many others.  It’s easy to get mistaken for a backing musician, as Carole King and Neil Diamond at first were thought by the public to be songwriters dabbling with hit records.  Time proved both King and Diamond to be major forces beyond their work for other artists and this Lee is himself making waves regionally outside of the background circuit he participated in for the last decade and more. With Jim Henry’s electric guitar and dobro fitting in perfectly with this quartet and some backing vocals from Brie Sullivan and Max Wareham, these half a dozen songs stand up to repeated spins with  “Hands of Fortune”  and “To Write You a Song” truly remarkable.    At the risk of sounding overly complimentary, those who have followed this writer’s thousands of reviews over the past almost five decades know that I can be as rough on poorly made recordings as I can hand out the accolades on the ones with merit. There’s something very special here. You’ll know you’ve reached the right Eric Lee as this music stands in a class by itself.

- Joe Viglione (The Noise, Boston)